"African Americans AND Gentrification in Washington, DC - Race, Class and Social Justice in the Nation's Capital"

Last Date:


Location: 
901 G Street, NW
Building: 
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library
Room: 
Black Studies Center, Room 316
Details: 

Using oral interviews, qualitative and quantitative data to explore the experiences and ideas of African Americans confronting and constructing gentrification in Washington, DC, African Americans and Gentrification in Washington, DC is a highly anticipated ethnography on a subject of great intrigue and consequences from a well-known public scholar and intellectual. The book contextualizes Black Washingtonians' perspectives on belonging and attachment during a marked period of urban restructuring and demographic change in the Nation's Capital and sheds light on the process of social hierarchies and standpoints that have unfolded over time.

Sabiyha Prince, PH. D, is a cultural anthropologist and independent scholar who resides in the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area. She taught at American University in Washington for a dozen years and has been an adjunct faculty at Coppin State University in Baltimore. Prince has worked on numerous committees and attended conferences locally, across the U.S. and internationally. She currently works as a contractor for the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum.

 

Cost: 
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC